About

HISTORY: WARRICK COUNTY SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT DISTRICT:

To understand the District, its functions and authorities we must understand the conception of the Solid Waste Management Districts within the State of Indiana.

The State Legislature: In late 1989 into 1990 State Legislators were provided with extensive information concerning a growing and perceived solid waste crisis that was felt to be looming. As the Legislator’s investigated they found that the local county disposal places (landfills) were rapidly declining in space and that if something was not done that the State would experiences the accumulation of solid waste with no place for it to go. County Governments were challenged by fiscal limitations and were not enthusiastic in developing or establishing waste diversion programs in their counties. The State Legislature recognized the concern and in 1990 created legislation which directed the formation of Solid Waste Management Districts in order to develop and implement Solid Waste Management Plans that would create recycling and other waste diversion programs in an effort to divert 50% of the waste being generated away from landfills.

In 1991 the Warrick County Solid Waste Management District was created. In accordance with State Requirements the Warrick County Solid Waste Management District Board of Directors (WCSWMD) was created. Currently the Board consisted of 7 members as follows;

1. 3 Commissioners – Don Williams, Marlin Weisheit, Richard Reid
2. 1 County Council Representative – Greg Richmond
3. The Mayor of Boonville – Mayor Charlie Wyatt
4. Boonville City Council Representative – David Talley
5. A Member at Large from one of the Smaller Communities approved by the Commissioners – Kristi Adams, Tennyson Town Council

The State Legislature provided for the WCSWMD Board of Directors to develop its own budget for operations. The State Legislature also authorized the District to collect property taxes at a rate not to exceed $0.008 per $1000.00 of assessed property value for its operations. It further provided for user fees, tipping fees and a number of other fee schedules in order to provide the District with adequate funding. Goal: Keep trash out of the ever shrinking landfills.

WCSMD’s Board of Directors was responsible for all activities; as a separate quasi-governmental Agency operating separately from the County Commissioner and County Council direction and approval. The District Staff operated under Personnel Policies separate from the Warrick County Commissioner’s Program. Salaries are based upon the District’s Salary Plan. Benefits are provided by the District through an agreement with the County Commissioners, Fulltime District employees are able to receive medical benefits. The Costs of such Benefits are paid by the District to the County. District employees are not County Employees!

Once created the Boards first challenge was to create and implement a State Mandated Solid Waste Management Plan (WCSWMP). By years end this plan was created and the District began implementation of that Plan. The Board of Directors then established the Finances, Policies, Fees charged for services and hired the staffing needed to implement its Solid Waste Management Plan.

At this time the Warrick County Commissioners operated a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill on Pelzer Road, Boonville, Indiana which continued operations until 1992. The County Commissioners also established Waste Collection Facilities throughout the County in the 1970s which were in operation when the District was created. For this reason the WCSWMD worked with the Warrick County Commissioners to establish recycling collection drop-off centers at these waste collection locations in an attempt to meet the goals of District’s Solid Waste Management Plan.

In 2008 the State Legislature conducted a review of the Solid Waste Management Districts and deemed it desirable to have the District’s Budget undergo non-binding review so that the County Council would be aware of the Financial Aspects of the District and would provide an understanding of the needs and operational expenses needed by the District to meet its responsibilities.

In 2009 the County Commissioners and The District Board saw the advantage of combining the Waste Disposal Program controlled by the County Commissioners with the efforts being implemented by the District thereby placing all Solid Waste Management Activities under the authority of the Warrick County Solid Waste Management District. Employees of the Commissioner’s Program became Employees of the WCSWMD. This Program Continues today!

In 2010 the State Legislature further adjusted the County Council Authority to provide for binding review and approval of the District’s Budget. However, this adjustment left the responsibilities and authority over all remaining aspects under the control of the Warrick County SWMD Board of Directors who were still responsible for the development and oversight of the Budget being submitted to the County Council for Review.

The State Legislature allowed the WCSWMD Board to retain full authority to make special appropriations, acquire Bonds needed to conduct expansion of Programs, Development of Benefit and Job Performance Standards for Staffing, Hiring of Employees needed to conduct operations and planning, to set usage fees for trash disposal and all other activities related to the operation of the District under the control of the Warrick County Solid Waste Management Board of Directors without obtaining County Council Approval.

On January 01, 2012 the WCSWMD Board of Directors approved the District to begin doing business as (dba) the Warrick County Recycling & Resource Management District. The District currently operates 7 drop-off facilities. 5 allow for the collection of recyclables and waste while 2 provide for the collection of recyclable materials only. For 2013 the District has an approved Budget of approximately $2,187,000. The Property Taxes associated with this budget are $1,768,000 which is half of the District’s approved Property Tax Levy. Remaining revenues are generated from usage fees collected by the District for waste disposal activities and from the Sale of the Recycled Materials collected at the drop-off facilities. Currently, a new Fee Plan was adopted by the Board I December 2012 which adjusts fees associated with District Operations.

The District is currently working for the completion of plans for the installation of a natural gas recovery system on the site of the old landfill which will be converted to CNG for use in County and District Vehicles to be paid for from the diversion costs created by the use of natural gas. Further the District is working on the development and construction of a Recycling Material Process, Sorting and Warehouse Facility in order to capture the value associated with the sale of recycled materials. The ultimate goal of this project is to continue the development of a self-sustaining program which does not rely on Tax Dollars for funding while providing Warrick County Residents with quality recycling and waste management services.
Prepared On: November 28, 2012, Amended January 25, 2013 and February 05, 2013

Prepared By: R. Scott Anslinger, Superintendent
Warrick County Recycling & Resource Management District

Warrick County Solid Waste Management District
(dba: Warrick County Recycling & Resource Management District)
How We Operate & What We Do!

This information is important for your knowledge since it relates to the District and we hope will help you in understanding more about how the District operates.

District Finances:

Funding Mechanism:

The District is funded in 3 different ways. We receive property taxes at 0.0432 cents per thousand of assessed value. We receive revenues from the fees collected for waste disposal and the District receives revenues from the sale of Recyclable Materials (Commodities).

District Budget:

The District’s Budget for 2013 is $2,187,132.00 Which breaks down as follows:

In 2012 the County Council approved an allocation from our tax levy of $1,258,075. The remaining $929,057 funds needed to meet our budgetary needs come directly from the revenues generated from waste disposal and the sale of recyclables.

We continue to evaluate costs, set up programs to track these costs and have incorporated better accountability by staff in the performance of their duties. Currently the District collects only 72% of its allotted tax levy. We are allowed 0.06 cents for $1,000 of assessed value and we currently operate at 0.0432 cents per thousand of assessed value. The Districts Funds are not available for use by any other taxing body.

Cash Reserves:

Our cash Reserves are directly impacted by several factors. Governmental Mandates, proposed projects and fiscal conservatism by staff.

Governmental Mandates:

Mandates by the Department of Local Government Finance (DLGF) and the State Board of Accounts (SBA) provide an over inflated view of surplus cash. The District is required to maintain ½ of its annual budget in cash reserve. This amounts to about ($1,093,566.00) one million ninety three thousand five hundred and sixty six dollars.

Current Cash Reserve:

As you will note in the 2012 Annual 131 Report; we ended 2012 with a cash balance of two million two hundred and seventeen thousand eight hundred and eighty one dollars and twenty-two cents ($2,217,881.22).

DLGF and SBA requirement that we must maintain is $1,093,566.00 the remaining about $1,124,315.00 will be spent this year on the new Recycling, Processing Center which will cost us about 2 million and the relocation of the Chandler Site which I am projecting to cost about $400,000. The Chandler Site needs to be moved due to the Town of Chandler’s Utility Department needs to re-occupy the property. For this reason we are looking to relocate the site to property owned by the County at the intersection of Gardner Road and Fuquay Road.
We try to be very careful and conservative in how we spend tax payer’s dollars that is one of the reasons we are able to provide the service we do.

District Staff:

Large part of our budget also goes to pay for the compensation we pay to our employees. $916,074.00 is budgeted this year in order to meet the payroll and benefit responsibilities of the District; Currently, the District employee’s 9 Fulltime and 28 part-time Employees to meet its many responsibilities to our clients. Only the Fulltime employees receive benefits. Please find the attached roster which lists all our employees.

District Promotion & Advertisement:

Community Advertising:

Warrick County Standard – we advertise and promote through the Warrick County Standard. We adjust with ads, and articles to constantly change the message and to promote recycling and participation in the events we host throughout the year.

Radio – South Central Media:

We use the Radio network sponsored by South Central Media to get the message out. Last year we signed an agreement with South Central Media which was almost half the cost of advertising on just one Radio Station the previous year. Through our contract we promote the District on 5 different local stations including Jack FM (107.1), The Wolf FM (93.5), WIKY (104.1), WABX (107.5) and WSTO FM (96). Our message has been well received and the complaints from those not receiving information about our events has declined over the last year.
Flyers: – We print fliers that are distributed throughout the community. These fliers which promote our special events are distributed by the Warrick County Standard, at our drop-off centers, Libraries and at some of the county grocery and commerce outlets. Our intention is to raise awareness and to notify the public of upcoming events at a minimal cost. They will also be posted to our website once complete.

Education Programs:

School –

We offer Programs to local schools both private and public where we discuss topics of Environmental Awareness and how Recycling plays an important role in protecting the Environment of Warrick County. The Programs have been well received and we continue on occasion to receive request for additional presentations.

Community –

We provide presentations to local groups like the Chamber of Commerce, Kiwanis Clubs, other community organizations promoting our Programs and attempting to raise awareness about recycling in Warrick County.

Studio-Bee Grant –

In 2012 we provided a grant to Studio Bee of $20,000 that is used to educate school age children at both Studio-Bee as well as local schools in an attempt to raise awareness and educate school age children to the need and desire to recycle. This grant has dramatically increased our exposure in the community.

Community Events:

Ag Days – We participate in this event each year which helps us raise awareness and to provide a message concerning promotion of our programs.
Warrick County Fair: We participate at the County Fair each year by providing for the collection of recyclable materials and management of the events solid waste. As such the Fair Board allows us Booth Space to provide information to the public concerning District Programs.

Boo In Boonville: We participate annually where we hand out promotional materials to the kids in order to maintain our presence in the community.
Future Events: We are looking to assist with other events in the County in an effort to help promote recycling Programs and Waste Diversion. Events under consideration are; Fiddler Fest – Newburgh, Wine Tasting – Newburgh, Square Flare – Boonville and other Events that may be brought to our attention. DISTRICT PROGRAMS:
We offer a wide variety of Programs which have either been requested by our clients/taxpayers or have been provided for such a long time that they have come to be expected by our clients/ taxpayers. These Programs include;

Special Event Programs:

Annually the District Sponsors and Promotes 6 Special Events throughout Warrick County (Tire Amnesty Days – Pelzer Road, Boonville, Paper Shredding Events at the Boonville and Newburgh Wal-Mart Centers and the Household Hazardous Waste Collection Events offered in conjunction with ALCOA. The District Funds in conjunction with our Partners at ALCOA and Piranha Paper Shredding the Household Hazardous Waste Days and Paper Shredding Events. The Cost of the Tire Amnesty Events is paid for by the District.

Debris Management:

When Newburgh faced the Tornado last Spring our equipment was on site to help with the removal of debris. When the big Tornado hammered Newburgh several years ago the District helped with debris cleanup by locating its containers in key areas while offering locations where material could be gathered for final disposal. The cost of Debris Management was covered by the District so that the Town of Newburgh and Warrick County Proper did not have to absorb that cost. Some say that we were reimbursed by FEMA so that does not count. Please be aware FEMA only reimbursed the District for 80% of its disposal costs during the big Tornado and last Springs Cleanup and disposal costs received no reimbursement.

When Warrick County had demolition to complete on a structure in Quail Crossing the Districts equipment was provided for debris removal and the initial disposal costs were paid by the District. If the Courts order the County to Cleanup a property in Warrick County the debris from many of those cleanups is brought to the Pelzer Road location and disposal costs are paid for by the District. Liens are placed on the property but in most cases the District will not see reimbursement for those costs.

Plans are being developed by the District and will be presented for Board Approval that will better help us in handling a major disaster which generates a large quantity of debris materials.

Waste Management:
Governmental:

When County and Local Government Agencies have waste to dispose of the District accepts trash material at no cost to those Agencies or Departments. The District is responsible for the disposal of many County Agencies day to day waste materials. This service is provided at no charge to any of the County Departments. The District absorbed $33,984.00 in direct waste disposal costs for the Governmental Agencies of Warrick County and an additional $60,000 in indirect costs for a cost savings of almost $94,000.00.

We will continue to offer and expand those services to other county and local governmental entities this year with only one requirement; those requesting our assistance must establish a recycling program to pull out paper, cardboard, plastic containers, and metal containers from their waste stream. The District then absorbs any cost associated with their general waste disposal and provides the support for the removal of all recyclable materials. Please keep in mind that the national average states that a minimum of 80% of the solid waste generated in offices is recyclable.

Recycling Programs:
Drop-Off Centers:

The District operates 5 Drop-Off Centers. For the exact Location of these centers please see the attached supplement. Each Center collects cardboard, newspaper, mixed paper, plastic bottles/containers (#1 & #2 Plastics), aluminum cans, metal cans, glass separated by color (clear, brown, green, blue). This material is transported to several brokers in Evansville where we generate revenues from the sale of these materials referred to as commodities.

Small Business & School Recycling:

We provide small business/school recycling services to a number of small businesses and schools in Warrick County. At the present time the following organizations are part of our recycling program; Cintas Uniform Company, Allegheny Petroleum Company, Victoria National Golf Course, Boonville Flower Shop, Deckers Flowers & Gifts, Tastee Freeze, Café Azura, Hope Central Manna Market, Harbor House, Imagine Hair Salon, Izaak Walton League, SIRS, Boonville High School, Tennyson Elementary School and Yankeetown High School. We will soon implement a recycling program at Castle High School. In 2012 these outlets generated more than 36 tons of recyclable materials.

We are maximizing our returns on the sale of those recyclables collected by the District Last year we increased our revenues from May of 2010 to April 2011 from $50,000 to $119,000 from the sale of recyclables. The ultimate goal is to build a program that does not depend on tax dollars for the operation of our Program. In 2012 the District generated $94,710.10 from the sale of recycled materials.

Curbside Recycling Programs:

The District Funds the Curbside Recycling Programs in the Communities of Boonville, Chandler and Newburgh. Recycled materials are accepted from households at the curb in a single stream recycling program by Allied Waste of Evansville. Costs for funding of this Program are projected to be $182,380 in 2013.

Bulk Material Recycling:

Our Pelzer Road Collection Facility also recycles used Motor Oil, Scrap Aluminum, Steel and White goods. Some of the materials are suitable for reuse but most are separated and transported to area scrap dealers for processing. This material does generate revenue for the District.

Yard Waste:

We offer Yard waste collection to both Residential and Commercial Businesses in Warrick County at our Pelzer Road Location. Residential Clients experience no charge for grass clippings and leaves.  As of July 2016 the District will be charging ALL residents $0.03 per pound for all tree limbs, brush and related wood waste materials; if the wood waste material is larger than 3″ in diameter residents will be charged $0.03 per pound with a $10.00 minimum for 500 pounds or less.

Disposal & Handling:

The District Offers 5 Drop-Off Centers which collect bagged and containerized waste material. Those sites are located at Casey Road – Newburgh, Fuquay Road – Chandler, Seven Hills Road – Elberfeld, Spurgeon Road – Lynnville, Pelzer Road – Boonville. We also operate a bulk material containerized transfer station at our Pelzer Road – Boonville Facility. Operating Hours vary dependent upon location. Currently we collect a fee of one dollar ($1.00) per bag for bags 13 gallon or less and two dollars ($2.00) for every bag 40 gallon or less; no bags over 40 gallons and/or 40 pounds will be accepted.  The public pays three cents ($0.03) per pound for each pound of bulk trash that goes across the scale with a fifteen ($15.00) dollar minimum.
It is important to note that our current IDEM Permits allow us to collect only Residential Waste Materials. We are not permitted to accept commercial or industrial waste materials.
n 2012 we established the collection of unwanted, unused medications at several police agencies including; Boonville, Chandler, Newburgh Police Departments, the Sheriff’s Department and Coroner’s Office. The collection of this material has removed narcotics from our community and hazardous drugs from our water supply.

Government Regulations:

The District is required to comply with IDEM (Indiana Department of Environmental Management) Rules and Regulations pertaining to the operation of our containerized transfer facilities and the Yard Waste Materials that are accepted at Pelzer Road and our Drop-Off facilities. In 2012 we began renewal of our Transfer Station Permits which are needed for the collection and disposal of Trash and Debris and the Renewal of our Composting Permits which are needed for operation of our Yard Waste Collection Program. The Transfer Station Renewal has been completed. The District is allowed to accept only residential waste from both in and outside our county. The District is forbidden to collect commercial or industrial waste without increasing our Permits to a Waste Handling Permit. A fee of $12,500 is required to obtain that permit and we have decided that it is not prudent to request that permit at this time. We have submitted the necessary information for renewal of our Compost Permit and await IDEM’s renewal of that Permit. I hope this information proves helpful. Thank you! Scott R. Scott Anslinger, Superintendent Warrick County SWMD 1111 S. Pelzer Road Boonville, IN 47601 Ph #: (812) 897-6210 Cell #: (812) 760-5799 Email: rsa@warrickrecycles.org ~~HISTORY: WARRICK COUNTY SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT DISTRICT: To understand the District, it’s functions and authorities we must understand the conception of the Solid Waste Management Districts within the State of Indiana.

Click here to read more about Government Regulations…

The State Legislature: In late 1989 into 1990 State Legislators were provided with extensive information concerning a growing and perceived solid waste crisis that was felt to be looming. As the Legislator’s investigated they found that the local county disposal places (landfills) were rapidly declining in space and that if something was not done that the State would experiences the accumulation of solid waste with no place for it to go. County Governments were challenged by fiscal limitations and were not enthusiastic in developing or establishing waste diversion programs in their counties. The State Legislature recognized the concern and in 1990 created legislation which directed the formation of Solid Waste Management Districts in order to develop and implement Solid Waste Management Plans that would create recycling and other waste diversion programs in an effort to divert 50% of the waste being generated away from landfills. In 1991 the Warrick County Solid Waste Management District was created. In accordance with State Requirements the Warrick County Solid Waste Management District Board of Directors (WCSWMD) was created. Currently the Board consisted of 7 members as follows; 1. 3 Commissioners – Don Williams, Marlin Weisheit, Richard Reid 2. 1 County Council Representative – Allan Holweger 3. The Mayor of Boonville – Mayor Pam Hendrickson 4. Boonville City Council Representative – Bob Barnett 5. A Member at Large from one of the Smallest Communities approved by the Commissioners – Alonzo Moore, Newburgh Town Council The State Legislature provided for the WCSWMD Board of Directors to develop its own budget for operations. The State Legislature also authorized the District to collect property taxes at a rate not to exceed $0.008 per $1000.00 of assessed property value for its operations. It further provided for user fees, tipping fees and a number of other fee schedules in order to provide the District with adequate funding. Goal: Keep trash out of the ever shrinking landfills. WCSMD’s Board of Directors was responsible for all activities; as a separate quasi-governmental Agency operating separately from the County Commissioner and County Council direction and approval. The District Staff operated under Personnel Policies separate from the Warrick County Commissioner’s Program. Salaries are based upon the District’s Salary Plan. Benefits are provided by the District through an agreement with the County Commissioners, Fulltime District employees are able to receive medical benefits. The Costs of such Benefits are paid by the District to the County. District employees are not County Employees! Once created the Boards first challenge was to create and implement a State Mandated Solid Waste Management Plan (WCSWMP). By years end this plan was created and the District began implementation of that Plan. The Board of Directors then established the Finances, Policies, Fees charged for services and hired the staffing needed to implement its Solid Waste Management Plan. At this time the Warrick County Commissioners operated a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill on Pelzer Road, Boonville, Indiana which continued operations until 1992. The County Commissioners also established Waste Collection Facilities throughout the County in the 1970s which were in operation when the District was created. For this reason the WCSWMD worked with the Warrick County Commissioners to establish recycling collection drop-off centers at these waste collection locations in an attempt to meet the goals of District’s Solid Waste Management Plan. In 2008 the State Legislature conducted a review of the Solid Waste Management Districts and deemed it desirable to have the District’s Budget undergo non-binding review so that the County Council would be aware of the Financial Aspects of the District and would provide an understanding of the needs and operational expenses needed by the District to meet its responsibilities. In 2009 the County Commissioners and The District Board saw the advantage of combining the Waste Disposal Program controlled by the County Commissioners with the efforts being implemented by the District thereby placing all Solid Waste Management Activities under the authority of the Warrick County Solid Waste Management District. Employees of the Commissioner’s Program became Employees of the WCSWMD. This Program Continues today! In 2010 the State Legislature further adjusted the County Council Authority to provide for binding review and approval of the District’s Budget. However, this adjustment left the responsibilities and authority over all remaining aspects under the control of the Warrick County SWMD Board of Directors who were still responsible for the development and oversight of the Budget being submitted to the County Council for Review. The State Legislature allowed the WCSWMD Board to retain full authority to make special appropriations, acquire Bonds needed to conduct expansion of Programs, Development of Benefit and Job Performance Standards for Staffing, Hiring of Employees needed to conduct operations and planning, to set usage fees for trash disposal and all other activities related to the operation of the District under the control of the Warrick County Solid Waste Management Board of Directors without obtaining County Council Approval. On January 01, 2012 the WCSWMD Board of Directors approved the District to begin doing business as (dba) the Warrick County Recycling & Resource Management District. The District currently operates 7 drop-off facilities. 5 allow for the collection of recyclables and waste while 2 provide for the collection of recyclable materials only. For 2013 the District has an approved Budget of approximately $2,187,000. The Property Taxes associated with this budget are $1,768,000 which is half of the District’s approved Property Tax Levy. Remaining revenues are generated from usage fees collected by the District for waste disposal activities and from the Sale of the Recycled Materials collected at the drop-off facilities. Currently, a new Fee Plan was adopted by the Board I December 2012 which adjusts fees associated with District Operations. The District is currently working for the completion of plans for the installation of a natural gas recovery system on the site of the old landfill which will be converted to CNG for use in County and District Vehicles to be paid for from the diversion costs created by the use of natural gas. Further the District is working on the development and construction of a Recycling Material Process, Sorting and Warehouse Facility in order to capture the value associated with the sale of recycled materials. The ultimate goal of this project is to continue the development of a self-sustaining program which does not rely on Tax Dollars for funding while providing Warrick County Residents with quality recycling and waste management services. Prepared On: November 28, 2012, Amended January 25, 2013 and February 05, 2013 Prepared By: R. Scott Anslinger, Superintendent Warrick County Recycling & Resource Management District Warrick County Solid Waste Management District (dba: Warrick County Recycling & Resource Management District) How We Operate & What We Do! This information is important for your knowledge since it relates to the District and we hope will help you in understanding more about how the District operates. District Finances: Funding Mechanism: The District is funded in 3 different ways. We receive property taxes at 0.0432 cents per thousand of assessed value. We receive revenues from the fees collected for waste disposal and the District receives revenues from the sale of Recyclable Materials (Commodities). District Budget: The District’s Budget for 2013 is $2,187,132.00 Which breaks down as follows: In 2012 the County Council approved an allocation from our tax levy of $1,258,075. The remaining $929,057 funds needed to meet our budgetary needs come directly from the revenues generated from waste disposal and the sale of recyclables. We continue to evaluate costs, set up programs to track these costs and have incorporated better accountability by staff in the performance of their duties. Currently the District collects only 72% of its allotted tax levy. We are allowed 0.06 cents for $1,000 of assessed value and we currently operate at 0.0432 cents per thousand of assessed value. The Districts Funds are not available for use by any other taxing body. CASH RESERVES: Our cash Reserves are directly impacted by several factors. Governmental Mandates, proposed projects and fiscal conservatism by staff. Governmental Mandates: Mandates by the Department of Local Government Finance (DLGF) and the State Board of Accounts (SBA) provide an over inflated view of surplus cash. The District is required to maintain ½ of its annual budget in cash reserve. This amounts to about ($1,093,566.00) one million ninety three thousand five hundred and sixty six dollars. Current Cash Reserve: As you will note in the 2012 Annual 131 Report; we ended 2012 with a cash balance of two million two hundred and seventeen thousand eight hundred and eighty one dollars and twenty-two cents ($2,217,881.22). DLGF and SBA requirement that we must maintain is $1,093,566.00 the remaining about $1,124,315.00 will be spent this year on the new Recycling, Processing Center which will cost us about 2 million and the relocation of the Chandler Site which I am projecting to cost about $400,000. The Chandler Site needs to be moved due to the Town of Chandler’s Utility Department needs to re-occupy the property. For this reason we are looking to relocate the site to property owned by the County at the intersection of Gardner Road and Fuquay Road. We try to be very careful and conservative in how we spend tax payer’s dollars that is one of the reasons we are able to provide the service we do. DISTRICT STAFF: Large part of our budget also goes to pay for the compensation we pay to our employees. $916,074.00 is budgeted this year in order to meet the payroll and benefit responsibilities of the District; Currently, the District employee’s 9 Fulltime and 28 part-time Employees to meet its many responsibilities to our clients. Only the Fulltime employees receive benefits. Please find the attached roster which lists all our employees. DISTRICT PROMOTION & ADVERTISEMENT: COMMUNITY ADVERTISING: Warrick County Standard – we advertise and promote through the Warrick County Standard. We adjust with ads, and articles to constantly change the message and to promote recycling and participation in the events we host throughout the year. Radio – South Central Media: We use the Radio network sponsored by South Central Media to get the message out. Last year we signed an agreement with South Central Media which was almost half the cost of advertising on just one Radio Station the previous year. Through our contract we promote the District on 5 different local stations including Jack FM (107.1), The Wolf FM (93.5), WIKY (104.1), WABX (107.5) and WSTO FM (96). Our message has been well received and the complaints from those not receiving information about our events has declined over the last year. Flyers: – We print fliers that are distributed throughout the community. These fliers which promote our special events are distributed by the Warrick County Standard, at our drop-off centers, Libraries and at some of the county grocery and commerce outlets. Our intention is to raise awareness and to notify the public of upcoming events at a minimal cost. They will also be posted to our website once complete. EDUCATION PROGRAMS: School – We offer Programs to local schools both private and public where we discuss topics of Environmental Awareness and how Recycling plays an important role in protecting the Environment of Warrick County. The Programs have been well received and we continue on occasion to receive request for additional presentations. Community – We provide presentations to local groups like the Chamber of Commerce, Kiwanis Clubs, other community organizations promoting our Programs and attempting to raise awareness about recycling in Warrick County. Studio-Bee Grant – In 2012 we provided a grant to Studio Bee of $20,000 that is used to educate school age children at both Studio-Bee as well as local schools in an attempt to raise awareness and educate school age children to the need and desire to recycle. This grant has dramatically increased our exposure in the community. COMMUNITY EVENTS: Ag Days – We participate in this event each year which helps us raise awareness and to provide a message concerning promotion of our programs. Warrick County Fair: We participate at the County Fair each year by providing for the collection of recyclable materials and management of the events solid waste. As such the Fair Board allows us Booth Space to provide information to the public concerning District Programs. Boo In Boonville: We participate annually where we hand out promotional materials to the kids in order to maintain our presence in the community. Future Events: We are looking to assist with other events in the County in an effort to help promote recycling Programs and Waste Diversion. Events under consideration are; Fiddler Fest – Newburgh, Wine Tasting – Newburgh, Square Flare – Boonville and other Events that may be brought to our attention. DISTRICT PROGRAMS: We offer a wide variety of Programs which have either been requested by our clients/taxpayers or have been provided for such a long time that they have come to be expected by our clients/ taxpayers. These Programs include; Special Event Programs: Annually the District Sponsors and Promotes 6 Special Events throughout Warrick County (Tire Amnesty Days – Pelzer Road, Boonville, Paper Shredding Events at the Boonville and Newburgh Wal-Mart Centers and the Household Hazardous Waste Collection Events offered in conjunction with ALCOA. The District Funds in conjunction with our Partners at ALCOA and Piranha Paper Shredding the Household Hazardous Waste Days and Paper Shredding Events. The Cost of the Tire Amnesty Events is paid for by the District. Debris Management: When Newburgh faced the Tornado last Spring our equipment was on site to help with the removal of debris. When the big Tornado hammered Newburgh several years ago the District helped with debris cleanup by locating its containers in key areas while offering locations where material could be gathered for final disposal. The cost of Debris Management was covered by the District so that the Town of Newburgh and Warrick County Proper did not have to absorb that cost. Some say that we were reimbursed by FEMA so that does not count. Please be aware FEMA only reimbursed the District for 80% of its disposal costs during the big Tornado and last Springs Cleanup and disposal costs received no reimbursement. When Warrick County had demolition to complete on a structure in Quail Crossing the Districts equipment was provided for debris removal and the initial disposal costs were paid by the District. If the Courts order the County to Cleanup a property in Warrick County the debris from many of those cleanups is brought to the Pelzer Road location and disposal costs are paid for by the District. Liens are placed on the property but in most cases the District will not see reimbursement for those costs. Plans are being developed by the District and will be presented for Board Approval that will better help us in handling a major disaster which generates a large quantity of debris materials. Waste Management: Governmental: When County and Local Government Agencies have waste to dispose of the District accepts trash material at no cost to those Agencies or Departments. The District is responsible for the disposal of many County Agencies day to day waste materials. This service is provided at no charge to any of the County Departments. The District absorbed $33,984.00 in direct waste disposal costs for the Governmental Agencies of Warrick County and an additional $60,000 in indirect costs for a cost savings of almost $94,000.00. We will continue to offer and expand those services to other county and local governmental entities this year with only one requirement; those requesting our assistance must establish a recycling program to pull out paper, cardboard, plastic containers, and metal containers from their waste stream. The District then absorbs any cost associated with their general waste disposal and provides the support for the removal of all recyclable materials. Please keep in mind that the national average states that a minimum of 80% of the solid waste generated in offices is recyclable. Recycling Programs: Drop-Off Centers: The District operates 7 Drop-Off and one Mobile Collection Centers. For the exact Location of these centers please see the attached supplement. Each Center collects cardboard, newspaper, mixed paper, plastic bottles/containers (#1 & #2 Plastics), aluminum cans, metal cans, glass separated by color (clear, brown, green, blue). This material is transported to several brokers in Evansville where we generate revenues from the sale of these materials referred to as commodities. We are trying to meet the needs of our citizens/clients in the most cost effective way we can find without drastic increases in labor and operating costs. In 2012 we offered free electronics collection for all items but TV sets at Pelzer Road. The District also collects expired and waste batteries. All size batteries are recycled in order to remove the hazards they posed from our environment. We do not receive money for the small batteries but the larger car and industrial batteries are marketed through local dealers and revenues are generated. Small Business & School Recycling: We provide small business/school recycling services to a number of small businesses and schools in Warrick County. At the present time the following organizations are part of our recycling program; Cintas Uniform Company, Allegheny Petroleum Company, Victoria National Golf Course, Boonville Flower Shop, Deckers Flowers & Gifts, Tastee Freeze, Café Azura, Hope Central Manna Market, Harbor House, Imagine Hair Salon, Izaak Walton League, SIRS, Boonville High School, Tennyson Elementary School and Yankeetown High School. We will soon implement a recycling program at Castle High School. In 2012 these outlets generated more than 36 tons of recyclable materials. We are maximizing our returns on the sale of those recyclables collected by the District Last year we increased our revenues from May of 2010 to April 2011 from $50,000 to $119,000 from the sale of recyclables. The ultimate goal is to build a program that does not depend on tax dollars for the operation of our Program. In 2012 the District generated $94,710.10 from the sale of recycled materials. Curbside Recycling Programs: The District Funds the Curbside Recycling Programs in the Communities of Boonville, Chandler and Newburgh. Recycled materials are accepted from households at the curb in a single stream recycling program by Allied Waste of Evansville. Costs for funding of this Program are projected to be $182,380 in 2013. Bulk Material Recycling: Our Pelzer Road Collection Facility also recycles used Motor Oil, Scrap Aluminum, Steel and White goods. Some of the materials are suitable for reuse but most are separated and transported to area scrap dealers for processing. This material does generate revenue for the District. Yard Waste: We offer Yard waste collection to both Residential and Commercial Businesses in Warrick County at our Pelzer Road Location. Disposal & Handling: The District Offers 5 Drop-Off Centers which collect bagged and containerized waste material. Those sites are located at Casey Road – Newburgh, Gardner Road – Chandler, Seven Hills Road – Elberfeld, Spurgeon Road – Lynnville, Pelzer Road – Boonville. We also operate a bulk material containerized transfer station at our Pelzer Road – Boonville Facility. Operating Hours vary dependent upon location. The public pays three cents ($0.03) per pound for each pound of bulk trash that goes across the scale with a fifteen ($15.00) dollar minimum. It is important to note that our current IDEM Permits allow us to collect only Residential Waste Materials. We are not permitted to accept commercial or industrial waste materials. In 2012 we established the collection of unwanted, unused medications at several police agencies including; Boonville, Chandler, Newburgh Police Departments, the Sheriff’s Department and Coroner’s Office. The collection of this material has removed narcotics from our community and hazardous drugs from our water supply. GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS: The District is required to comply with IDEM (Indiana Department of Environmental Management) Rules and Regulations pertaining to the operation of our containerized transfer facilities and the Yard Waste Materials that are accepted at Pelzer Road and our Drop-Off facilities. In 2012 we began renewal of our Transfer Station Permits which are needed for the collection and disposal of Trash and Debris and the Renewal of our Composting Permits which are needed for operation of our Yard Waste Collection Program. The Transfer Station Renewal has been completed. The District is allowed to accept only residential waste from both in and outside our county. The District is forbidden to collect commercial or industrial waste without increasing our Permits to a Waste Handling Permit. A fee of $12,500 is required to obtain that permit and we have decided that it is not prudent to request that permit at this time. We have submitted the necessary information for renewal of our Compost Permit and await IDEM’s renewal of that Permit. I hope this information proves helpful.

 

 

Thank you!

Scott R. Scott Anslinger, Superintendent Warrick County SWMD 1111 S. Pelzer Road Boonville, IN 47601 Ph #: (812) 897-6210 Cell #: (812) 760-5799 Email: rsa@warrickrecycles.org